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About Dr. Kevin Schug

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Kevin Schug is Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). Since joining UTA in 2005, his research has been focused on the theory and application of separation science and mass spectrometry for solving a variety of fundamental and applied analytical and physical chemistry problems.

Latest News

News

DISCUS breaks 50 lesson plan ...

50th

DISCUS now has 50 and counting K-12 science lesson plans, free and available for use by science teachers.  Lessons cover Read more

DISCUS breaks 1000 registered users! ...

1000+

We now have more than 1000 registered K-12 teachers, parents, and students registered on the website and using all of Read more

DISCUS on Facebook

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Diversity in Science in the United States is now on Facebook.  Pretty soon, we'll have this blog linked through twitter and Read more

DISCUS Approaching 1000 Users

10001

Following efforts at the Texas State Fair and the Sally Ride Science Festival, we are happy to report that we Read more

About DISCUS

What is DISCUS?
Diversity in Science in the United States (DISCUS) is the educational component of a National Science Foundation-funded research program. It is a K-12 educational outreach program designed to:
  • Increase awareness of the need for more scientists.
  • Develop pedagogical tools to increase knowledge retention for diverse student populations.
  • Communicate opportunities and routes to higher education for students with limited English proficiency (LEP). Collect and disseminate special higher education opportunities for LEP students nationwide.
Why is DISCUS important?
Less than optimal funding for K-12 education throughout the country and an increasingly diverse student population in the classroom dictates the need for more resources to address this difficult situation. Overall, the number of students with limited English proficiency(LEP) has grown more than 60% in the past 10 years, and in some states, the number of LEP students has doubled since 1995. LEP students now make up more than 10% of the total K-12 student population in the country.
How does DISCUS help?
To help address this problem, especially for the purpose of encouraging more students to follow career paths in science, the DISCUS program will:
  • Facilitate development and dissemination of pedagogical materials (lesson plans) which improve the communication of important scientific concepts to a diverse student population
  • Collect and disseminate special higher education opportunities for LEP students nationwide
  • Increase awareness and excitement for science by holding a booth annually at the Texas State Fair.
How can I get more involved?
  • Register now to become a member of DISCUS, the intersection between diversity, science, education, and fun. 
  • Share your lesson plan ideas and collaborate with your peers.
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Register now to become a member of DISCUS

nsflogoThis website is meant to provide you with all of the information and resources that the DISCUS program has to offer. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CHE-0846310. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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